Procedures and Surgery
Maternity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gynaecology
 
 
 
 
Ultrasound scan
 
 
 
 
 
Contraception
 
 
 
 
 
Ultrasound Scan
 
 
 
Breast scan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maternity - Frequently Asked Questions

 

1. What is the normal weight gain for a full course pregnancy? I wonder if I had gained too much weight.
2. Should I eat as much as I can during pregnacy to supply my baby's needs as well as mine?
3. Are there any foods that I should avoid during pregnancy?
4. I am at my 10th weeks of pregnancy and having fever. Can I take panadol?
5. Can I travel during pregnancy?
6. Can I continue to work full-time during pregnancy?
7. Should I stop having sexual intercourse during pregnancy?
8. When will I feel my baby's movements in my womb?
9. I feel my baby's movements better at night. Is it because my baby is more active at night?
10. Is it true that a pregnant woman's teeth decay easily?
11. Doctors told me that I have placenta praevia. What is placenta praevia and what can I do about it?
12. Do all placenta praevias need Caesarean section?
13. What is abruptio placenta?
14. What is the treatment for abruptio placenta?
15. I was diagnosed with ectopic pregnancy. What is ectopic pregnancy?
16. Do all ectopic pregnancies require the removal of fallopian tube?
17. I have small breasts and I wish to breastfeed my newborn. I wonder whether I can produce enough milk for my newborn.
18. When can I resume sexual life after delivery?
19. What can I do to regain my figure after delivery?
20. Can I breastfeed while taking medicines?

 

1.
What is the normal weight gain for a full course pregnancy? I wonder if I had gained too much weight.
 

The weight gain of every expectant mother varies. The ideal total weight gain should be between 10 to 15 kg. If you have excessive weight gain, you may have problems of diabetes mellitus, too big a baby, increased risk of Caesarean Section and difficulty in getting back to the body weight before pregnant.

 
   
2.
Should I eat as much as I can during pregnacy to supply my baby's needs as well as mine?
 
Good nutrition is essential for the healthy development of your growing baby and the maintenance of your own health. You should eat 'well' and not 'a lot' as the quality of food intake is more important than the quantity. You should take a balance diet with sufficient meat and protein, vegetables and fruits, adequate carbohydrate for energy and a glass of milk a day. Supplements of vitamin and iron are taken as a routine to prevent deficiency of vitamin and iron which are needed for your growing baby.
 
   
3.
Are there any foods that I should avoid during pregnancy?
 
There are some food taboos that have been passed down from the old generations. Those taboos include eating black sauce, mutton and 'cooling foods' such as watermelon, coconut water and pineapple. But there is no medical evidence against the consumption of these foods during pregnancy. If you are in doubt, consult your doctor. However, you should avoid the intake of alcohol (cause more abnormal baby), coffee or tea (caffeine-containing products). Do not take raw, undercooked or unwashed foods to prevent transmissions or infections.
 
   
4.
I am at my 10th weeks of pregnancy and having fever. Can I take panadol?
 
You should never self-medicate during your pregnancy because many medicines can pass to your baby through placenta and cause him harm. This is particular so during the first 3 months of your pregnancy when all organs of the baby are developing. Certain medicines can obstruct the development of the organs in the baby during these period and later result in abnormal in newborn. Seek advice from your doctor before taking any medicine.
 
   
5.
Can I travel during pregnancy?
 
It is advisable to avoid traveling on a long trip during pregnancy, especially if you are having problems with your pregnancy such as vaginal bleeding, excessive vomiting or during the last month of pregnancy. But there is no real danger in traveling if you are healthy. You should inform your doctor if you plan to travel.
 
   
6.
Can I continue to work full-time during pregnancy?
 
You should carry on with your work if you are feeling well and happy. Many women work right till the day of delivery. If your work is stressful, requires a lot of traveling or excessive physical activities, then it is advisable to stop working one month before your expected delivery date.
 
   
7. Should I stop having sexual intercourse during pregnancy?
  In theory, you can have intercourse right till the last week of your pregnancy. However, it is wise to stop in the last month or earlier, mainly because your tummy is big and making the sexual intercourse uncomfortable. If you have the history of preterm labour, placenta praevia (low placenta) or vaginal bleeding, then intercourse must be avoided.
 
   
8. When will I feel my baby's movements in my womb?
 
You will start to notice your baby's movements between 18 to 20 weeks of your pregnancy if this is your first pregnancy. In second or third pregnancy, you will feel it between 16 to 18 weeks.
 
   
9.
I feel my baby's movements better at night. Is it because my baby is more active at night?
 
Actually your baby is active all the time, no matter day or night. You will feel more movements at night because you are quiet and resting during this time.
 
   
10. Is it true that a pregnant woman's teeth decay easily?
 
Yes. Because a pregnant woman will need more calcium during pregnancy for her growing baby as well as her own health need. If her calcium intake is insufficient, then the calcium will be drawn from her body to the baby. Poor calcium intake together with poor dental hygiene will make her teeth decal easily. To prevent this, pregnant women should drink plenty of milk and pay attention to her dental care.
 
   
11.
Doctors told me that I have placenta praevia. What is placenta praevia and what can I do about it?
 
Placenta praevia is low-lying of the placenta within the womb and it covers part or all of the cervix (opening of the vagina to the womb). The symptoms of placenta praevia are painless vaginal bleeding and abnormal fetal presentation in the third trimester of pregnancy. If you are told to have placenta praevia, then you should avoid vigorous exercise and relax more. If you start to have vaginal bleeding, you must be admitted to the hospital and have your condition and baby monitored. If the bleeding is excessive before your expected delivery date, your doctor may deliver you by Caeserean Section earlier planned.
 
   
12. Do all placenta praevias need Caesarean section?
 
 When placenta praevia goes into labour, the cervix opening will dilate and bleeding will occur because the placenta sits at the opening. That's why your doctor will have your pregnancy delivered by Caeserean Section at 38 weeks of your pregnancy. In a few rare cases where the placenta is at the margin of the cervix and does not obstruct the birth canal, delivery by vagina may be attempted.
 
   
13. What is abruptio placenta?
 
Abruptio placenta is premature separation of placenta from the womb surface and bleeding will occur at the point of separation. As the uterine contractions progress, separation increases. The causes of abruptio placenta is unknown, but it is associates with passed history of abruptio placenta, hypertension, gestational diabetes and multiple pregnancy. The symptoms of abruptio placenta include severe abdominal pain which is continuous, back pain, vaginal bleeding after 25 weeks of pregnancy and uterine contractions that do not relax.
 
   
14. What is the treatment for abruptio placenta?
 
There is no treatment to stop the abruptio or reattach the placenta back to the womb. Care given to the mother and baby depends on the amount of bleeding, gestational age and the condition of the fetus. If the bleeding is excessive or the pregnancy has reached 38th week of pregnancy or the fetus is distressed, the emergency delivery by Caeserean Section is needed. Severe blood loss may require blood transfusion.
 
   
15. I was diagnosed with ectopic pregnancy. What is ectopic pregnancy?
 

Ectopic pregnancy is also known as tubal pregnancy. It is a condition whereby the embryo implants inside the Fallopian tube instead of in the womb. As the embryo grows, it will rupture through the Fallopian tube, cause internal bleeding and threaten the life of the mother. The symptoms of ectopic pregnancy include severe abdominal or pelvic pain, fainting attack (particularly upon standing) shoulder rib pain and vaginal bleeding. 

 
   
16. Do all ectopic pregnancies require the removal of fallopian tube?
 

Most cases of ectopic pregnancy require immediate surgery to remove the embryos and stop the bleeding. If the condition is untreated in the early part of the pregnancy, the growing embryo will rupture the Fallopian tube, cause internal bleeding and damage the internal female organs which later leads to infertility. In early cases, a limited removal of the embryonic tissues will survive and allow the tube to be salvaged. Other cases will require complete removal of the tube.

 
   
17.
I have small breasts and I wish to breastfeed my newborn. I wonder whether I can produce enough milk for my newborn.
 
The amount of milk produced does not depend on the size of your breasts. Small breasts can still produce sufficient milk for your newborn.
 
   
18. When can I resume sexual life after delivery?
 
You can resume your sexual life once both of you and your husband are ready to do so. Generally, it should be 6 weeks after delivery or after the postnatal check-up. This period allows your episiotomy wound to heal and your body returns to its pre-pregnant stage.  You will encounter some vaginal dryness, so it is advisable to use some lubricant if you feel so.
 
   
19. What can I do to regain my figure after delivery?
 
A combination of balance diet and regular exercise will help to regain your figure that to its pre-pregnant stage . Breastfeeding will further help to this process.
 
   
20. Can I breastfeed while taking medicines?
 
You should discuss with your doctor before taking any medicine, even medicines for mild illnesses such as cold, flu and fever. Some medicines will be passed to your baby through your breast milk.